Motivational Speaking

Speaking Services

My goal as a speaker is to equip and inspire your audience with strategic, psychologically-sound, actionable steps in mother-daughter, parenting, and interpersonal relationships.

As a professional speaker, clinical psychologist, and mother of twin adult daughters, I understand the important role that speakers play in the success of an event.

I’ve presented in private functions for clients, and delivered keynote speeches at industry events such as the Rutgers University Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology (GSAPP) Cultural Conference, Knowing God Ministries Women’s Luncheon, Team Hill Foundation Holiday (Basketball) Tournament Classic, Middlesex County Association of Psychologists Luncheon, DECA & Key Club Global Entrepreneurial Week, and Rutgers University-Camden’s Body Awareness Week.
“Dr. Deering's presentation is very informative and mind-opening.”
Anna Sullivan | Mom | 9-13-2019
“I learned so much about mother-daughter relationships.”
Barbara Munden | Mom | 9-13-2019
“Fantastic speaker who uses her life as teachable and ever-evolving.
Very approachable.”

Jennifer Bailey | Mom |  9-13-2019
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Topics I Speak On

My most requested keynote is on the topic of mother-daughter relationships titled Girl, Why You Are Not Your Momma. This new talk stems from my published book, What Moms Never Tell Their Daughters: 5 Keys To Building Trust, Restoring Connection, & Strengthening Relationships (AAE Press, 2018).

I also speak on other parenting-related topics and can customize a presentation for your audience as well.

Most Popular Talk Titles

• Motherhood Is A C.H.O.I.C.E.
• What Mothers Never Tell...
• From Lemmings To Leaders

My Story: From Paradise to Devastating Defeat

On July 6, 2015, my family and I moved to the apex of living -- Apex, NC.

Coming off a high from running and completing my first Reebok Spartan Sprint Race, things were on track for helping my family through the life transitions they were facing.
My husband had crossed the finish line of a season of long-distance business travel. Our twin daughters were on the starting blocks for high school. I was …

…on my mark!

Everything was lined up for starting the next phase of my career as a nationally board certified sport psychologist.

Set!

Then, at 4:30 A.M. one quiet morning, the incessant meows of my elderly feline fur-baby startled me out of my resting state. While accommodating her “request” to be carried downstairs to be fed in the kitchen, my feet slipped on the steps.

Boom!

My cat survived. But my right hip took the brunt of the fall.

Not even out of the starting block and what was my prize? A torn labrum and one hip surgery.

Of the 6 weeks of immobility, 4 weeks of crutches, and 3 months of physical therapy, the immobility was the worst part.

For me, immobility equaled being unuseful. Immobility was unfamiliar terrain for me, because I had been running my life on the premise that I had to be useful to somebody at all times or else no one would care about or care for me.

And I carried that weighty belief about my usefulness into my adult years, especially as a mom.

You see, my identity was wrapped up in being the strong one— Super Mom. My role as “the mom” was to race around and keep the batons of my family member’s lives—especially my daughters’ lives—moving forward. This is how I was useful to them.

My daughters only saw me as Super Mom. They’d never seen me incapacitated or off track.
And seeing me that way, they shied away from me.

Guilt’s Companion—Regret—Made Me Question Every Decision I Made

Every time I would ask my daughters to help me, they would either hem-and-haw or not help me. While their responses angered me, their averted eyes pained my heart worse than my surgeon’s scalpel on my hip.

As I convalesced in bed, guilt then joined the relay and began to consume my thoughts each time my daughters would cite “having homework” to do or “practice to attend.”

Who was I to ask for help? My daughters had more important things to do.

After all, for their whole life, I’d been verbally telling them to focus and take care of their school work so that they’d keep things moving forward in their own lives.

I’d been useful—passing the “batons”—to them to keep things moving forward in their lives all this time.

My thoughts circled back around and wallowed in wondering if I’d trained them too well; to the exclusion of their learning how and when to stop to help someone else…me—their own mom—with my baton. The guilt became unbearable.

But then regret entered the relay and made me question every time I’d chosen to prioritize my daughter’s needs over my own. Both guilt and regret rendered me tongue-tied and unable to genuinely express myself and my needs to anyone, especially my daughters.

Ding Ding! (The bell lap.)

Resignation took over my thoughts: “I’ve reaped what I sowed.” And my thoughts got expressed in bitter remarks and complaints…which fueled more arguments, tensions, and silent treatments. It all sounded so familiar.

My chest hit the tape.

I sounded just like my mom.

You see, my mom was bitter about her lot in life—being a single mom and having to raise two daughters on her own in the South Bronx. She’d had no one to help her.

So, when my own teenage daughters would not offer to help me during my 6-week convalescence, I would recall how, as a teen myself, I never offered to help my mom with tasks at home.

Exhausted and wobbly at the finish line from this anger-guilt-regret-resignation relay in my heart and mind, I felt like “karma” had bitten me in the butt—literally.

Even worse, I feared that the “dysfunctional cycle” of my patterns I’d had with my mom would continue into my relationship with my own daughters.

The Key To Overcoming My Setback Was One Guiding Principle: Pause To Consider.

But like any good exhaustion after a difficult workout, my six weeks of convalescing forced me to pause to consider and face my real feelings, fears, and hopes regarding myself, my daughters, and my relationship with them.

As my mind and heart raced around the track of my life, I saw how honest reflection and courageous ownership could provide strategic direction for radical change in our mother-daughter relationship.

So after having been cleared to return to race training and I found out that I’d re-torn the same hip labrum, I was quicker to pause to consider how I would approach my second round of convalescing.

Then I Realized The Truth Of My New Life Is Found In What Moms Never Tell Their Daughters.

There were things that my mother was never able to tell me because she did not know when or how to pause to consider her life.

During my second season of convalescing, I decided to apply my psychologist training on myself and assess what I’d not been able to tell my daughters. I combined those insights with my 20+ years of doing clinical work with mothers and daughters into a framework of principles that I now share in my presentations.

My passion is to empower moms through my empathic, down-to-earth, and inspiring message.

That message is one of hope that as mothers and daughters connect intentionally they can improve relationally in the race of their lives.

Change is possible.

Healthy mother-daughter relationships are possible.
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“Dr. Michelle Deering is …an effective speaker...in the...area (of) strengthening relationships between parents and their children.
I have had the pleasure of hearing Dr. Deering speak....and have always ...found incredible value in her message.
I highly recommend her as an insightful and engaging speaker.”

Kenneth Penkowski | Brother of a Sister-Mom | Senior Partner, Eletrope | 2018

Sample Video Clips

Girl, Why You Are Not Your Momma!

Video clip from KGM Women's Luncheon Keynote (Cary, NC). [Video: Coming Soon ! ]


Do You Know What Mothers Never Tell Their Daughters?
A 90-second video of me speaking to moms (& dads) at Barnes & Noble (Columbus, OH) book-signing event.
Unlocking Entrepreneurial Potential_Dr. Michelle Deering
Part of my keynote address ("Lemmings To Leaders™") to DECA students at Apex Friendship High School.
How To Keep Your Daughter’s Dreams Alive
A 90-second video from my YouTube channel's Mothering Motivation Monday™ series.
Keynote addresses
Motivational presentations
Workshops and training services
These services are perfect for schools, student & business groups, professional & community organizations. Services are also available for seasonal meetings and yearly conferences.